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American Heart Association sends Ron Paul best wishes for a full recovery

(NewMediaWire) – September 25, 2020 – DALLAS – The American Heart Association and its division, the American Stroke Association, send former Texas congressman and presidential candidate Ron Paul well wishes for a full recovery. Media reports indicate that Paul, age 85, suffered an apparent stroke during a live stream event this afternoon.

A stroke can happen to anyone at any age; however, the risk does go up with age. 

“While we don’t know the cause of Congressman Paul’s illness, it’s important for everyone to know the signs of stroke,” said Mitchell S.V. Elkind M.D., M.S., president of the American Heart Association and a professor of Neurology and Epidemiology at Columbia University and attending neurologist at Columbia University Medical Center of the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. “During a stroke, time equals brain. The faster a person gets emergency care the better their chance for a good outcome. ”  

The acronym F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the most common signs of a stroke and what to do. Spot a stroke FAST.

  • Face drooping.
  • Arm weakness.
  • Speech Difficulty.
  • Time to call 9-1-1.

Paul tweeted a photo from a hospital indicating that he was doing well.

Stroke can be caused either by a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain (called an ischemic stroke) or by a blood vessel rupturing and preventing blood flow to the brain (called a hemorrhagic stroke). Treatment options depend on the type of stroke.

Risk factors for stroke include smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity and other cardiovascular diseases such as atrial fibrillation, or AFib (a heart rhythm disorder) and family history.

Stroke is the No. 2 cause of death worldwide and a leading cause of disability. Many people may not know that often strokes are treatable.

To learn more about lowering your risk for stroke, visit www.stroke.org 

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For Media Inquiries and AHA/ASA Expert Perspective: 214-706-1173

For Public Inquiries: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721)

heart.org and stroke.org



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